Salt on my Asphalt 2.2

Salt on my Asphalt 2.2
Uģis Albiņš
21/01 – 26/02/2022

With us seemingly knowing this and that about them, forms are building imaginary scenarios in the space of their use and interrelations. By dispersing and shuffling the usual methods of constructing functionality the industrial mechanisms reverberate in the surfaces and uneven continuations of the space to converse about the unnoticeable, the self-evident while trying to untangle the social and aesthetic choreography of form creation.

Support: VKKF

dwelling

dwelling
Philip Hinge
4/12/2021 – 15/01/2022

Windows, closed with broken panes, augment quartered interactions. If you stand close enough sometimes it’s difficult to figure out if you’re looking in or out. The intimate scenes squeeze small dramas into their shallow space. A cat, since expired, is coddled by a spermatozoon ghost. A distraught snowman knocks on a window, desperate to get inside. In another, a ghost is stopping in the doorway to take a long glance before finally leaving.
Although linked by proximity, these works span the distance between the pre and post-pandemic world. Their reflections invert and distance each felt moment, blurring the timeline of events and instances. Neglect is measured against happiness, indifference against a joke. The spectrum is run ragged, self-populating infinitely in the absence of an audience.

Support: VKKF

Photos: Līga Spunde

El Camino 427

El Camino 427
Ricardo van Eyk
15/09 – 16/10/2021

Often large in scale, many of Ricardo van Eyk‘s works resemble, at first glance, neglected or else partially restored surfaces familiar from the built environment: temporary panels put up around construction sites that have attracted crude graffiti, say, or else cracked walls that are halfway through the process of being re-plastered. Perhaps his practice is, at base, a meditation on time. Not only because his paintings hum with an awareness of the history of his medium, but because of their playful way with the language of entropy and repair. Patching something up – whether it’s a wall, or an entire cultural edifice – is not a done-in-one job, but an ongoing process. As van Eyk is aware, palimpsests are where we are fated to make our homes.

During a two-week working period at 427 in Riga, observations during walks in the Baltic city will inform a site-specific process in the exhibition space. As a guest to the city, Van Eyk’s fascinations for the public domain and its traces of the old and new as expressed in architecture, infrastructure and other visual identities will surely be met, resulting in a temporary interpretation.

Support: VKKF, Mondriaan Fund, Ammodo and Amsterdam Fund for the Arts, Beerfox

Photos: Līga Spunde

Laika Tips (Necessary Illusions)

Laika Tips (Necessary Illusions)
Ola Vasiljeva
30/07 – 28/08/2021

Ola Vasiljeva (1981, Latvia) lives and works in The Hague, NL. Her work has been widely exhibited internationally, including solo exhibitions at BOZAR Centre for Contemporary Art (BE), Passerelle (FR), Vleeshal (NL), Kunstverein Münich (DE), Kunstverein Graz (AT), Supportico Lopez (DE), Pori Art Museum (FI), Kaiser Wilhelm Museum (DE), Art in General (US), kim? (LV) , De Appel (NL), and others. Ola Vasiljeva is the founding member of OAOA (The Oceans Academy Of Arts).

Vasiljeva creates immersive installations, in which she fuses literary, social and cultural references to create evocative choreographed tableaux. Her practice is informed by theatricality and often seeks to subvert the sense of place, bringing the work to the realms of fiction and stage. Vasiljeva’s practice is currently concerned with the notions of decline, collapse of knowledge forms and social and cultural temporalities.

The installation at 427 Gallery, entitled “Laika Tips” (“Necessary Illusions”) reinterprets the physicality of the gallery space, formerly a small business storefront. The installation combines architectural interventions, sculpture, cultural residues and industrial remnants. “Laika Tips” articulates a sense of vacancy permeating the city, and gives it a tangible, forlorn presence. While the entire front space is staged as barely a décor, the incentive backstage hides more in its sleeve.

Supported by VKKF, Stroom Den Haag

Photos: Līga Spunde

Cybervikings of Mars

Cybervikings of Mars
Līga Spunde
19/06 – 19/07/2021

The future visions don’t sound like acid jazz anymore and – whatever sound the future holds – it won’t be audible in space. But before, each garage is seen as forge, each latte and each cigarette – as rocket fuel. Falling down a chart staircase Martin Eden sank in depths of the ocean, and at the instant he knew he was surrounded by darkness, he ceased to know. In streets of cities people join in chants while waiting for flood, waiting for darkness, waiting for the end of tuna steak era, waiting for instastory to upload.
– 37YO DOOMER

Support: VKKF

The Anticipation

The Anticipation
Daria Melnikova
11/05 – 5/06/2021

Support: VKKF

Photos: Līga Spunde

Tiled River

Tiled River
Jānis Dzirnieks
30/10 – 19/12/2020

The show is part of NADA Miami 2020 Riga presentation in collaboration with Kim? and Low

Support: VKKF, Rīgas dome

Memory

Memory
Kaspars Groševs, Marta Trektere
2/10 – 17/10/2020

Support: VKKF, Rīgas dome

Photos: Līga Spunde

Things after things

Things after things
Anna Ceipe
7/07 – 15/08/2020

– Why don’t we ever eat from this plate?

– You don’t understand, there are things to gaze upon only with your eyes. This dish has long turned into a relief and we will never eat from it.

Anna Ceipe graduated from the Department of Visual Communication at The Art Academy of Latvia in 2016, and has also studied in The Royal Academy of Fine Arts (KASK) in Belgium. Since 2011 she has been participating in exhibitions in Latvia as well as outside of it. Her most notable projects include her solo-exhibition „Seeking oasis” at LOW gallery (2018), group exhibitions “Serial solutions (Banalaics)” at Riga Circus elephant stables (2020), „Melos” at Exhibition hall Arsenāls (2019) and „State of Contemplation” at Riga Art Space (2016), and participation in the exhibition „Never ending journey, invisible island” at K. K. Fon Stricka villa (2016).

Supported by: VKKF, Rīgas dome

Photos: Līga Spunde

Sol LeWitt’s WD #719

Sol LeWitt’s WD #719
Elīna Vītola and Amanda Ziemele
Curators: Kaspars Groševs and Marta Trektere
03/04 – 30/05/2020

Mosaic “Sol LeWitt”

In remote self-isolation in the countryside, where books have stayed in the city’s bookshelves and I don’t wish to use the internet, without small shell-shaped madeleine cakes to soak in tea made of linden flowers that aren’t even picked yet, I try—from what has been left at my memory’s disposal—to assemble a mosaic: one of the many possible portraits of LeWitt.

1. White quadratic bone-like structures, but also wavy lines and bright coloured areas; drawings, drawings; and drawings that—following instructions—are executed by others interpreting the unexpressed (and inexpressible); black-and-white masked colouring-in clock design and the synagogue project; studies and notes as ready artworks; and solid, substantial, open-air sculptures / structures / “special objects”. These pieces of mosaic are too trivial and already worn out (pale and colourless).

2. I’ll start again: “when an artist learns their craft too well, they make slick art”—LeWitt’s 34th sentence on conceptual art (1968). Ingūna Skuja once said that for ceramists, “slick” is a positive, even praiseworthy quality, though that only points out that the grammar of the new art’s language is transgressive, breaking past laws, and “theatrical”, as Michael Fried would have said (and did so in 1967).

3. Structures just like structuralist structuralism and post-structuralism, “even though not completely dead”, are left in the past. Even if the new virus will create “structural changes”— a phrase that politicians have tediously worn out—then the basis of its consequences include shortness of breath and pulmonary edema forming in a human body. What is bodily in LeWitt’s structures and drawings?

4. Fragmentation. The Primary Structures exhibition opened at the Jewish Museum in New York on 26 April, 1966. In the small gallery eight (a former library whose neo-Gothic details were covered with black drapery), next to Walter De Maria’s literally caged ‘Cage’ (a work made from thin metal bars), was LeWitt’s cubic structure of 3 x 3 x 3 cubes, which would have been understood as secluded and self-sufficient—like a hedgehog—by the Jena Romanticists: “A fragment, like a miniature work of art, has to be entirely isolated from the surrounding world and be complete in itself like a hedgehog” (Friedrich Schlegel’s Athenaeum Fragment, 206). It was self-sufficient, and as if tuned out, for a moment, from the surrounding ecosystem (hedgehog), a case of art being from the global art world.

5. Even though the body stays here in the metaphor of the romantic that was Schlegel, in the context of LeWitt’s works, it wasn’t only a spectator’s body (and mind) that was needed to give meaning and scale to his processual structures and ideas, but in the moment, it’s the alienation of each one—an alienation from the seemingly organic unity that “late” (global and what not) capitalism is trying to present as instinctively inevitable, while simultaneously becoming fragmented but comprehensible, and able to be implemented, albeit at your home on an empty wall: a LeWitt drawing (tell them you’re in quarantine and the copyright agency won’t enter your room…).

6. But is there anything that I can’t instantly remember about LeWitt? What to fantasize about? Look, a shred of memory—he had a short text about the form of a ziggurat which—switching to city planning—would furthermore be better than the common skyscraper in New York (LeWitt had used ziggurat forms in several of his works). In some utopian past scenario, these kinds of skyscrapers wouldn’t be hit by airplanes (it wouldn’t be so effective and easy), and we would be spared from the bothersome airport control system (but it’s not important—now we will travel less, and hike more around our homelands, besides which there will be less air pollution). Such a number of towers of Babel would most likely confuse god, and they could cancel the Great Flood, initiated via global warming; the mix-up of languages would be reanimated with the help of some super-google-translate system, because all the small and dying languages, such as Latvian and others, would become intelligible, and we would get rid of the emaciated lingua franca, the crippled English.

7. I remember lectures with quotes of memories of Adrian Piper—how she and Sol were ecstatic about Beckett—dialogues and situations without context (another “hedgehog-ist”) that fits so well with the unrepresentative literalism of the visual forms of minimalism. Every now and then, I have tried different texts by Beckett imagining examples of what they could have read, but in my opinion, the diagram with a slight time shift tracking the unsuccessful meetings of Mercier and Camier is still the best—these ridiculously absurd protagonists who share the name of the novel are immortal because they find it almost impossible to meet and… get infected (to tell the truth, I must admit that by stubbornly repeating their arrival, waiting for five minutes, going for a walk, returning and so on, they do meet after 45 minutes).

8. Literature. I rifle through the book shelf at the country house in Latgale looking for inspiration, until I find the unread Old Curiosity Shop by Dickens as a Russian translation. From the first pages, I meet the gaze of a collector type, as if described by Walter Benjamin: “There were suits of mail standing like ghosts in armour here and there; fantastic carvings brought from monkish cloisters; rusty weapons of various kinds; distorted figures in china and wood and iron and ivory; tapestry and strange furniture that might have been designed in dreams.”

9. Lines that haven’t been seen even in dreams—if perhaps credited to some mad mathematician—is what someone might say about LeWitt’s drawings. Isn’t this the right time to look into your attic, in an old closet, at forgotten childhood memories, to turn to never before noticed people? Could it be a vocabulary for the new art whose grammar is yet to be found (or, whose grammar is only coming into being)? And could this young and unpredictably diverse art vocabulary—let’s indulge in the positive impulse, hidden in utopia—be the one whose influence will contort or knock down the ruling consumerist attitude and the critical art discourse, partly servicing it, and partly battling it?

Kombuļi rural municipality, 31 March, 2020.

Jānis Taurens.

Love to Katie Lenanton!
Very special thanks to Sofia LeWitt!

Photos: Līga Spunde

Die Geister. One Step Beyond

Die Geister. One Step Beyond
Curated by Marta Trektere and Kaspars Groševs
20/02 – 28/02/2020

Opening: February 20th 7pm

This highway goes one step beyond heaven. Stomps the weight of boulders. Breathy quadraphonic howls, you find yourself in fantazia while trying to grasp figureless haze in all colors imaginable. As a drip of sweat tickles the tip of your nose you start to see a color you never thought existed. You’ve become a sorcerer’s apprentice.

The Sorcerer’s Apprentice was a segment in Disney’s feature-length cartoon Fantasia (1940). The part where Mickey Mouse is an apprentice to a sorcerer and fools around with magic tricks is based on Goethe’s poem “Der Zauberlehrling”. The lines in which the apprentice implores the returning sorcerer to help him with the mess he created have turned into a cliché, especially the line Die Geister, die ich rief (“The spirits that I called”), a garbled version of one of Goethe’s lines (Die ich rief, die Geister, / Werd’ ich nun nicht los), which is often used to describe someone who summons help or allies that the individual cannot control, especially in politics. Or raves.

With works by:
Maya Bendavid, Baojiaxiang and SwS, Simon Kounovsky, Theodore Darst, Dave Greber, Valentýna Janů, Ville Kallio, Jaakko Pallasvuo, Anni Puolakka, Clifford Sage, Deirdre Sargeant

Supported by: VKKF

Baojiaxiang and SwS – WIWMAVGAIWLDSAATCWA What If We Made A Video Game And It Was Like Dark Souls And All The Characters Were, Part 1
4:29, 2020

This work has been commissioned and produced by KONTEJNER and in collaboration with Sonic Acts, as part of Re-Imagine Europe project, co-funded by the Creative Europe Programme of the European Union.
Anni Puolakka – Oestrus
8:27, 2020

Oestrus was made as part of Puolakka’s solo exhibition at Polansky gallery, curated by Christina Gigliotti and on until 21 March 2020.
Maya Bendavid – Popccorn Ceiling Maiden
2:27, 2018
Dave Greber – YouCantRiptheSkinOffofaSnake III
3:03, 2020
Simon Kounovsky – epoch_acts
1:12, 2020
Theodore Darst – Ripple
4:52, 2020
Valentýna Janů – Is Your Blue the Same As Mine?
11:40, 2018
Jaakko Pallasvuo – Blink 182 Barcelona
6:41, 2020
Ville Kallio – Venmo Combat
5:05, 2019
Jon Rafman – A Man Digging
8:20, 2013
Deirdre Sargent – Tigers in Toyland
10:51, 2018
Clifford Sage – Reincarnational Disorder ‘RED OUT’
8:40, 2013

Rats dream about the places they want to explore

Rats Dream About The Places They Want To Explore
Maren Karlson
06/12/2019 – 10/01/2020

Opening: December 6th 7pm

it’s what the rock says
because the earth speaks
it sings too
lalalalala doo doo doo oooooooooo
No Where is quiet
she was in my dreams again last
night
did i swallow a spore that made me dream
Drink coffee in the morning
Ya it’s hazelnut
Refuse to write down dream
because the rat doesn’t write it
down why should i?
OK taurus is stubborn. I write it down:

she has short brown hair that’s somewhat brittle but it smells really lovely like a worn in t-shirt that hasn’t been washed. she must dye it that color. I think she has a lot of greys, but it doesn’t matter. If she didn’t dye it I’d still think she was beautiful. age doesn’t matter. i get to roll around in her bed and smell her sheets and smell her hair. i wonder why smelling things is so comforting. breathe in really deep and fall past this part of dream into another. into another. into another. singing in my ear, it’s so quiet it tickles. my ears are sensitive. but i breathe back into hers. hers is a shell that spirals inwards. trace the shape until the scale of my finger outgrows it. not sure i can reach the center of the labyrinth but she tells me I can and puts my finger back where it was and tells me to continue on my path.

I wake up.

– Brook Hsu, 2019

Maren Karslon is a drawer and painter living and working in Berlin.

Supported by: VKKF

Photos: Līga Spunde

Parasitia

Parasitia
Anni Puolakka
10/10 – 08/11/2019

Parasiting parasites in a psychedelic ceremony.

Parasitia
Parasitia
Blood blending into sepia
We are each other’s media
In my secret world
In my sacred words
Cats living in conspiracies
Infants are eating infancy 
Sipatiara
Sipatiara
Mother is joining antifa 
Business as usual mama
Raining bugs and birds
Snowing bats and moose
Breast bursting milk for immune boost
Feast hurting head my brain is juiced
Rapatiasi
Rapatiasi
True parasites are you and me
True parasites are you and me

Co-performers: Marta Trektere and Ieva Tarejeva
Costumes made in collaboration with Karolina Janulevičiūtė
Music made in collaboration with Miša Skalskis

Anni Puolakka is a visual and performance artist based in Helsinki and Rotterdam. She incorporates biographical and documentary materials into fictional worlds in her videos, performances, videos installations and images. They play with the boundaries and potential of humans as they seek meaningful and vibrant – sometimes drowsy or ambivalent – involvement with other beings and objects. Puolakka’s works have recently been shown at No Moon (NYC), Kunsthalle Bratislava, Le Lieu Unique (Nantes), Kiasma Museum of Modern Art (Helsinki), and Performance Space (Sydney).

Thank you: Kaspars Groševs
Supported by: VKKF, Arts Promotion Centre Finland and Nordic Culture Point

Photos: Ira Brut, Kristine Madjare, Miša Skalskis, Liga Spunde

Bludna Loza

Bludna Loza
Anna Slama & Marek Delong
Curator: Christina Gigliotti
04/09 – 27/09/2019

It’s not easy to find the Bludna Loza, but she’s there. After walking some half day, sleeping on the dried pine needles and earth, hungry and sore, you’ll find her. She is not the tallest tree in the woods, nor the fattest, nor lushest. In fact, Bludna Loza has no leaves at all. Her bark is dark and wrinkled. Some say her roots run so deeply into the ground you could never find where they end. Ancient, slow growing, she is the keeper of our memories. All lives that have transpired and died on our planet are held inside her belly.

When you find her, press your palm to her trunk. Run your hands along her craggy roots and you will feel the pulsations, the flow of energy emanating from her–the tree that knows not death.

– Christina Gigliotti

Marek Delong and Anna Slama are an artist duo from the Czech Republic, based in Prague and Stockholm. They started to cooperate while they both studied at Faculty of Fine Arts in Brno, Czech Republic. Currently their works are created in a two seperate places and meet physically usually while installing a final exhibition piece, where they create an intended complex scenery.

Together they presented their work in solo exhibitions: “Andromeda” at Catbox Contemporary, New York, 2019, “Will I Be a Better Man If I Stop Dreaming of the Stars” at Futura, Prague, 2019, “Sticky Moment” at EKA Gallery, Tallinn, 2018, “Femme Fatale Brewery” at Karlin Studios, Prague, 2017), “Good Old Sober Addict” at City Surfer Office, Prague, 2016. Group shows: “Letting Go” at Trafo Gallery Budapest, 2017, “Afterbirth of a Dream” at Meetfactory, Prague, 2017, “Robin” at YABY, Madrid, 2018, “Wicked Anima Fun” at Gallery Stephanie Kelly, Dresden, 2018 and “When the Sick Rule the World” at Gr_und, Berlin, 2019.

Support: VKKF
Special thanks to: Rebeka Lukošus and Laima Ruduša

Photos: Līga Spunde

Champs-Élysées

Champs-Élysées
Botond Keresztesi, Emma Stern, Līga Spunde, Sandra Kosorotova, Tea Stražičić, Nick Zhu
Curated by Marta Trektere un Kaspars Groševs
7/06 – 16/08/2019

Support: State Culture Capital Foundation, Nordic Culture Point

Photo: Līga Spunde

A Guide to Making a Genie

A Guide to Making a Genie
Atis Jākobsons, Raids Kalniņš, Lev Kazachenko, Zane Raudiņa, Ieva Rubeze,
Viktors Timofejevs, Alexandra Zuckerman
Curators: Ieva Kraule and Kaspars Groševs
12/12/2014 – 6/02/2015

While the city is dressing up in bright Christmas lights and children are having fun in the ice-rinks with their parents sweating in the shops’ queues, in this darkest time of the year the shiny white walls of the gallery are wrapping themselves into a cloak of rosy light. Every now and again dizzying swirls of sandalwood smoke veil what has never been disclosed to the ignorant. Lifeless flowers have hung their heads down in the presence of winter. Artists’ works hiding in the dark corners of the gallery are peering back at the viewer – some in remembrance of the beginng of the world and ancient rituals, others striving to heal the ones weakened by the Christmas hustle. In a place now hiding beyond the strict rules of the rational and the material, these words are heard quietly:

Om! I wish, I plead and I command for a lot of pure, good, strong cosmic prana and akasha to flow, appear and accumulate right away in this space around me. May prana and akasha flow from the East, the West, the North, the South, the heights, the depths, the vastness, the faraway and all the states where they are currently free and can assist in the work of creation. May the prana and akasha flow that can extricate from water, fire, earth and air.”
(Mirdza Bendrupe)

Support: State Culture Capital Foundation, VKN, Valmiermuižas alus, Veto vīni

Photos: Līga Spunde

κπ

κπ
Līva Rutmane
6/11 – 5/12/2014

The necessity of this symbol has been reviewed by the Latvianizing Society that considers it to be if not acceptable, then at least suitable and necessary addition to the Latvian language. After tiring yet fruitful debates lead by chairman D. K. it was decided that this symbol – ka-pa-pi? or KPP? – seems to be the most suitable Latvian version of the often used letter combination.

For the sake of further euphony it was decided to pronounce this new Latvian letter combination by basing it on the pronounciation of greek alphabet letters of κ (kappa) un π (pi) thus ensuring its attractiveness to the users of international language and youths.

Hence examining the essence of this letter combination it was concluded that it expresses surprise, but that its conotation is rather negative – in Latvian it could be described by “troubled” and “agitated”, that indicates anxiety, an unpleasant insertion in the daily routine, a perplexity of what is happening. With this letter combination indicating the very inability of describing the existing insertion in the occurence thus arriving at an exclamation, the subject’s reaction to the absurd. Similarly this exclamation could be used when recognising the discord arising in a moment of sudden appearance of the asymetry of physical reality, finding a distortion in the succession of habits, as well as the realisation of an awkward mistake, marking the beginning and end of a euphoric state, in case of a rapid change of circumstance etc.

Līva Rutmane was born in 1984, graduated MA in Graphic Art at the Art Academy of Latvia (2014) and currently draws. She has been participating in exhibitions since 2002. There are no remarkable changes or drastic turns expected in the future.

Support: State Capital Culture Foundation, VKN, Chomsky

Photos: Līva Rutmane

Dance Blue

Dance Blue
Marija Olšauskaitė
18/09 – 25/10/2014

If I would write longhand invitation ‘I would like to invite You to an exhibition’, the word sexy could be transparent. Anchor plate binds a single My bar, it lingers for a new pole. Dance sad, while curtains are standing.

Marija Olšauskaitė (b. 1989) lives and works in Vilnius, Lithuania. Olšauskaitė studied sculpture at Vilnius Academy of Arts. Recent exhibitions include: Marija & Petras Olšauskai: “Miss Bird”, Art in General, New York (2014), “What thinks me”, Saint-Petersburg (2014), solo exhibition at Round Studio, Vilnius (2013), “Auction” Contemporary Art Centre, Vilnius (2012), solo exhibition at The Gardens, Vilnius (2012), “Ornament” National Gallery of Art, Vilnius (2012).

Support: State Culture Capital Foundation, VKN, Kim? Contemporary Art Center, Malduguns, Veto Vīni

Photos: Rauls Pauls

Second Water

Second Water
Monika Lipšic
18/09 – 25/10.2014

Voice~over reads a theory of metaphor in a composition about this particular problem of aesthetics. If we watched more at beautiful things our eyes would turn more beautiful – reads the voice. But if beauty is the object of love, and love has three steps until we reach the very giving and abstract loving, how to experience beauty not embodied in anything physical or spiritual? Metaphors make us see one thing as another. A successful metaphor evokes an image which we otherwise haven’t seen before – it provokes to realize something for the first time. The composition about a metaphor sailing in the sea of stories.

Monika Lipšic lives and works in Vilnius. Her last projects were exhibition curated in Saint-Petersburg “What thinks me” (2014), Agency’s show curated at CAC, Vilnius – “Agency. Scripted by characters” (2014), group performance “Karaoke Police. A Game of Opposites” (2013-2014), residency Joy & Mirror. “Actions on the island in Sardinia”, exhibition film “Exhibition on Stage. God from the Machine” (2013), exhibition “The Collector”, CAC, Vilnius and others.

Support: State Culture Capital Foundation, VKN, Kim? Contemporary Art Center, Malduguns, Veto Vīni

Photos: Rauls Pauls

Like Nature But Not

Like Nature But Not
Vivienne Griffin
20/08 – 13/09/2014

How can one recoup yet remember the infinite beauty of nature? Returning home diffused dusk is rolling around the floor, the sun-tan fades in the cool light of the refrigerator, the impressions are shifted from their source and positioned in a new context between the damp walls.

A glacier is like a river caught in the shutter of camera. Click. Except that it’s in real time, a slow moving thing, melting shifting screaming down the fucking mountains, chunks falling off into the river and on to the sea.

Vivienne Griffin lives and works in London. She studied in Hunter College, New York (MFA 2009). Griffin works with various media, including text, drawing, performance and sculpture. She often collaborates with Irish artist Cian McConn and has participated in many group shows. Her previous solo show “The Me Song For Now Here” (2013) took place at Bureau Inc. gallery, New York.

Photos: Rauls Pauls

Buster Friendly Format 4-2-7

Buster Friendly Format 4-2-7
Gaile Pranckunaite
1/08 – 15/08/2014

The TV set boomed; descending the great empty apartment building’s dust-stricken stairs to the level below, John Isidore made out now the familiar voice of Buster Friendly, burbling happily to his system-wide vast audience.

Buster Friendly was a radio programme created by Gaile Pranckunaite. It was inspired by a fictional TV/radio celebrity from Philip K. Dick’s novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. During the weekly programme various audio books and poetry readings would be mixed with looping ambient sounds. The sessions were held down at the radio Rietveld basement, at the Gerrit Rietveld Academy (Amsterdam), broadcasted through the online radio website.

Buster Friendly continues to look for new ways of being audible. This time, for 427, buster’s preparing 3 numeric mixtapes, exploring the fourth, the second and the seventh signs of the zodiac. Next door you may also discover bits of the ninth sign, in video format.

Gaile Pranckunaite ir a graphic designer based in Vilnius.

Support: State Culture Capital Foundation, VKN, Veto Vīni

Photos: Rauls Pauls

Nobody Dances Like That Anymore

Nobody Dances Like That Anymore
Ieva Kraule
05/06 – 19/06/2014

Severin can dance. He’s dancing foxtrot and cha-cha-cha – under his polished shoes covered with grooves created by nimble steps. The moment when the sole touches the varnished floor an unexpected, yet predictable creak dies away in the hustle of the steps and the overall noise turns into an awkward silence; nobody dances like that anymore.

The exhibition took place over the course of seven evenings in June – the 5th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 17th, 18th and 19th, from 6 to 8pm.

Photos: Rauls Pauls

Fermentation

Fermentation
Īrisa Erbse
19/11 – 18/12/2015

Gamma ray

The kernel

Meadow

Saison

Running dune

Arctic sunstone

Sloth (the sinner series)

Schwarz

Īrisa Erbse (1990) works with painting and writes poetry. She has graduated Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Lives and works in Cologne. Her previous exhibitions include “Milling” at Choice space in Cologne (2013), “Lautering” at Distribution Lorry gallery in London (2014).

Photos: Līga Spunde

Breakout. The Lost Knight

Breakout. The Lost Knight
Raids Kalniņš
1/10 – 13/11/2015

…Old house
are not those places
graves move
a lot of graves
heavy steps
no sun
life is fading
damp…
damp everywhere

I SEE LIGHT!

FOREFATHERS ARE COMING!

Raids Kalniņš studied wood-sculpting at Liepāja Art Higschool and graduated from Liepāja Institute of Pedagogy. Previous exhibitions have taken place at Latvian Centre for Contemporary Art, Riga, RIXC Center for New Media Culture, Riga, and Liepāja museum. Selected group shows: “Negatnieki” at Latvian National Museum of Art Exhibition hall “Arsenāls” (2012), “Kvarķirņiks” (2010) and other projects.

Support: State Culture Capital Foundation, VKN, Veto Vīni

Photos: Līga Spunde

Agonisers

Agonisers
Gili Tal
6/08 – 28/08/2015

In his ‘Critique of Everyday Life’, Henry Lefebvre writes of:
‘Intense instants – it is as if they are seeking to shatter the everydayness trapped in generalized exchange. On the one hand, they affix the chain of equivalents to lived experience and daily life. On the other, they detach and shatter it. In the ´micro´, conflicts between these elements and the chains of equivalence are continually arising. Yet the ´macro’, the pressure of the market and exchange, is forever limiting these conflicts and restoring order. At certain periods, people have looked to these moments to transform existence. ‘ [1]

As media and political powers increase in centralisation and control everything around them dilapidates in near perfect reciprocity. At the same time, the reality of this experience is continually subdued by the promise of immediate or virtual presence elsewhere or by identification with a different period in time. The vital elsewhere seems most effective as possibility, as image idea, as a moment of frisson.

There is a cyclical relationship between the material world and its romanticisation that often works on a tragic / euphoric order. Even the most tired iteration of say, Americana (as seemingly mythical signifier of a period ending with the break up of the Breton Woods agreement in the early 1970s and the consequent slide to neoliberalism) is still affective in giving rise to an imagination of urban living that alters in turn the appearance of Poplar, 2015.

In literature the figure of the flâneur embodies one way of achieving transformation. The flâneur wanders round the city floating from salon to café, amusing himself and making discoveries, experiencing the city as if it were the substance of a dream. Since love is the conquest of discontinuity between individuals, there is an erotic dimension to this “losing oneself” in the crowd, or in the city. In a varying light, Marx also referred to this when he stated in the Grundrisse that Capital must “strive to tear down every spatial barrier to intercourse, i.e., to exchange, and conquer the whole earth for its market”, and it seems true that for at least three decades now the invocation of the flaneur, as agent, has led not so much to timeless experiential drift (nevermind the production of revolutionary spaces) as to what is euphemistically named regeneration.

[1] Henri Lefebvre, Critique of Everyday Life, Volume 3, trans. Gregory Elliot (London/New York: Verso, 1991), p. 57.

Gili Tal (b. 1983) lives in London. Her recent solo and two-person shows include “Agonisers” at Temnikova & Kasela, Tallinn (2015), Life Gallery, London, with Lena Tutunjian (2015), “Panoramic Views of the City” at Sandy Brown, Berlin (2014), “Immobilien” at Muda Mura Muri, Zurich (2014), and “Real Pain for Real People” at Lima Zulu, London (2013). She has recently participated in group shows at Kunstverein Munich, Mathew, Berlin and New York, Vilma Gold, London, and Sandy Brown, Berlin.

Photos: Kristiāna Marija Sproģe

Princess PomPom in the Villa of Falling Flowers

Princess PomPom in the Villa of Falling Flowers
Matthew Lutz-Kinoy
18/06 – 1/07/2015*

Princess PomPom in the Villa of Falling Flowers presents itself as a dramatic exhaustion to the 427 gallery space. The narrative of the classic piece of Japanese Literature Genji Monogatari – The Tale of Prince Genji is being introduced as an environment study who’s protagonists are all equally degenderized and presented as an oversized scroll painting.

At the windows of the room cloudy character studies made of string hang from the ceiling. Gallery visitors are invited to enter the story through texture and not through text.

In collaboration with Kim? Contemporary Art Centre as a part of the project „Slash”.

The exhibition “Slash: In Between the Normative and the Fantasy” (curator: Kaspars Vanags) is the first time a public art institution in Latvia is turning towards “slashes” among contemporary art expression. More than 20 years had to pass since the decriminalization of homosexuality for such an exhibition, influenced by the digitalisation of personal life, to be possible – borrowing from the open-source mentality. The other, here, isn’t juxtaposed to the norm as something locked in the solitude of an individual strangeness or an impossible taboo, but as an awareness of an essentially recognizable, reachable, and modifiable aspect of personal identity.

Matthew Lutz-Kinoy (1984, New York) lives and works in Berlin and Los Angeles. He completed the Rijksakademie international artist residency in Amsterdam in 2010 and his undergraduate degree at The Cooper Union School of Art, New York in 2007. Recent solo exhibitions include: “Port”, Freedman Fitzpatrick, Los Angeles; “Lutz-Kinoy’s Loose Bodies”, Elaine – Museum für Gegenwarts Kunst, Basel (2013); “Matthew’s Secret”, Galerie van Gelder, Amsterdam (2013); “Werk is Free / Be Free! May Day”, Outpost, Norwich, UK (2013); and “KERAMIKOS” – a touring exhibition with Natsuko Uchino at the Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen; Kunsthalle Baden-Baden; Elaine Museum für Ge- genwarts Kunst, Basel and Villa Romana Florence (2012-2013). He has staged performances at the Kunsthalle Baden- Baden; Nomas Foundation, Rome; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; and the New Museum, New York. His videos have been screened at the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, Berlinale Film Festival; New Museum, New York; and White Chapel Gallery, London.

Support: State Culture Capital Foundation, Kim? Contemporary Art Center, VKN, Mozaīka, Valmiermuižas alus

*The exhibition was abruptly close because 427 gallery suddenly were kicked out of the space

Photos: Ansis Starks

M.S.

M.S.
20/05 – 12/06/2015

One of the earliest attempts of Latvian abstract art could be the painting which was initially intended as a parody – in 1920 a group of academically oriented artists collectively (while pretending to be one person – Reinholds Kasparsons) created “bumbist” paintings with which they hoped to uncover the flop of modernism. It was a “bumbist” painting, created by Jānis Roberts Tilbergs, that encouraged M.S. to commit to art. On idle evenings he thought about what he’s seen while drawing lines and mixing colours in his mind.

On May 20th 2015 gallery 427 opened M.S.’s monograph where finally there’s a collection of everything that’s known about this unknown artist. The monograph introduces M.S.’s creative search that have been created in unknown time period and explores various mediums and themes. The artist felt enthusiasm for drawings, colours and text. His works have never been shown publicly. Luckily over the years most of M.S.’s work has traveled to artist’s friends and associates. The monograph has been supported by people who shared M.S.’s work from their collections: Joey Villemont, Ēriks Apaļsais, Mikko Kuorinki, Inga Meldere, Sebastian Rozenberg, Zoë Paul, Edgars Gluhovs, OAOA, Carl Palm, Nicholas Riis, Alex Turgeon, Jade Fourès-Varnier & Vincent de Hoÿm, Aditya Mandayam & Ada Pola (Brud), Carl Palm, Amanda Ziemele, Evita Vasiļjeva, Neil Haas, Daria Melnikova, Marius Lut, Maija Kurševa, Robin von Einsiedel, Zīle Ziemele.
The publication is supplemented with texts by Jānis Taurens, Vasīlijs Voronovs, Virginija Januškevičiūtė, Valentinas Klimašauskas.

M.S. is born in 80’s, he studied at O. Kalpaks Riga Folk Art Primary School and Riga School of Design and Art, however he didn’t pursue art in the university. M.S. spends his days building practical constructions and is a devoted American football player.

Photos: Raul Paul

(intermission)

Intermission
Henning Lundkvist

While the gallery space was between exhibitions, from April 20th to May 20th, the website of Four To Seven was devoted to Intermission, a sound piece by Henning Lundkvist.

15.12. – 26.01.

15.12. – 26.01.
Carl Palm
15/12/2016 – 26/01/2017

Carl Palm (b. 1980, SE), based in Stockholm

Palm’s work spans across a wide variety of media including drawing, sculpture, print, installation, expanding into the realm of curating. Palm is interested in the step-by-step consideration of the process of art production and presentation and through predominantly sculptural gestures constructs his pieces as the points of emphasis. Intricate and unique in their own right, Palm’s works often point somewhere else, generating content without possessing it, acknowledging the context and presence of the other pieces in the show. Palm was educated at the Royal Institute of Art in Stockholm, MFA.

Carl Palm is the founder of the publication Good Times & Nocturnal News with contributions from international artists and writers. Previous issues have been presented at Komplot in Brussels, Contemporary Art Centre in Vilnius, Center, Berlin, Untitled, Miami, Friends with Books in Berlin and in connection to the 56th Venice Biennale and the Copenhagen Art Festival at Overgaden.

His recent and upcoming exhibitions include: Diesel Project Space (BE), S1, Portland (US), 427 Riga (LV), Nosbaum Reding (LU), X Bienal de Nicaragua (NI), XII Baltic Triennial at CAC (LT), Yautepec Gallery (MX),Cultural Foundation of Tinos (GR), GL Strand (DK), Overgaden (DK), Parallel Oaxaca (MX), Association Le Commissariat (FR), Kunsthalle Athena (GR), MACBA (ES), TOVES (DE), Kunsthalle Wien (AU), CAC (LT), Center (DE), ARTIUM (ES), Nosbaum Reding (LU), Komplot (BE) Index – The Swedish Contemporary Art Foundation (SE) and IASPIS at the 12th Istanbul Biennale (TR).

Photos: Kristiāna Marija Sproģe

GolfClayderman

11/11/2016

Let us enjoy reading this one of Modern GolfClayderman Stories “OxyMoron”.

Justin Time once said that fashion never goes out of style and we here at GolfClayderman know it the best. Like pantone dictates color of the year, we dictate what to wear- One Size Fits All Designer Jeans, Genuine Fake Dress Pants, White Gold Fake Jewelry, Green is the new Black Long Shorts, Half Naked Natural Makeup, Medium Large Long Sleeve T-Shirt, Barely Dressed Short Pants.

So if looking great is important to you, then we are the best choice.
GolfClayderman invites you to cut hair, get tattooed or put on makeup in beauty salon “OxyMoron 2016”.

Participants: TVMASKAVA, Demon Wariors, Miu

Support: Valsts Kultūrkapitāla fonds, VKN

♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪

17/11/2016

Let us enjoy reading this one of Modern GolfClayderman Stories “Stum der Liebe”.

It is party time in gallery 427. Christmas is so close, and so is Justin Times birthday. He wished he could get the newest new Baltic Slavs, Germanic, Pakistan fashion as a wonderful christmas present. All kids will get new Dolcci Gabbani, Armani, Versacci, Gucci Firucci, Masculini, Femini Short Pants. Grandmother will have a polo shirt with real horse on it. Mother will get a thick smock from Vivian West Gold Lable. Husband will have high-heeled purse from Little Tic Tac. So before you take Christmas card photo, or new facebook post for many likes, GolfClayderman invites you to find true love in the dating game “Sturm der Liebe 2016”

Find true love!

♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪

30/11/2016

Let us enjoy reading this one of Modern GolfClayderman Stories “Zvaigžņu parāde”.

Who can days of past estamate, increasingly new ones come in the place of gone, and the years between them as amber glows, and new stars do separate in the sieve of time.

Did Justin Time just sing and at the same time didn’t? He is in a superposition on the stage. When he picks up the microphone, he also reaches for the stars. The spectators all create an extending wave over space and time. Probability amplitudes provide a relationship between the wave of spectators and the results of observations of that lip sync contest. Results are great.
GolfClayderman invites you to the first and the last Popiela of 2016 “Zvaigžņu parāde”.

Photos: Elīna Vītola